An affordable investment opportunity for the masses

stockgraph

 

A good friend and colleague of mine, Dominic is promoting his new UK company, which offers some very appealing returns with better reasonable returns.

It is most appealing to me as a diversification from my usual currency and equity trading strategies. If you are interested in finding out more, I would read the following information Dom sent me:

We are looking for investors to help fund our asset secured stock financing company.

We are basically  a micro finance company providing credit lines to the motor trade secured against the stock the trader holds. We allow traders the ability to buy stock at a level they wouldn’t otherwise be able to achieve.  

Banks and larger financial institutions are becoming more and more limiting in their criteria for providing stock funding for sme’s creating a large  void in the stock financing sector. The second hand car market is estimated to be worth £43billion much of this money is taken through sme’s in the motor trade and with relatively few places providing easy access funding the opportunity here is expansive.

The model has been rolled out as a test on a small scale to a few traders to validate the sustainability of such funding in the smaller trade circles, with profound results each of the traders we used found that the funding created more opportunities than they had first planned gaining credibility and profit by simply increasing the quality or volume of the stock they held. We have a price point that is both affordable for the trader yet still profitable for ourselves and our investors. 

With a list of traders waiting eagerly to start using our stock funding facility we are looking to raise funds through private investment. We are paying between 16% and 20% per year on any capital invested. 

We are running a fantastic referral scheme so if you are not in a position to take advantage of this  know anyone who may be interested get in-touch.

For more information please contact Dominic on (44) 07398122296

Free Live Trading Workshop, London – 27th January 2016

Hi everyone,

First of all, a belated Happy New Year to you, and wishing you all the best for 2016!

I am presenting a free trading workshop in collaboration with Trade With Precision the week after next in London, and you are invited!

Read a little more about it here, and feel free to register to attend- I look forward to catching up with you then!

There are limited seats, and they will fill up fast.

Here is the link to register:

http://member.tradewithprecision.com/free_live_trading_workshop_london2016

tradersWorkshop

 

Best,

Ads

Update – Limited mentoring with Adam

Hi everyone!

It’s been a while and I hope you’re all making good progress with your trading.

Just to fill you in, I’ve put a lot of effort into setting up my fund trading and it’s been invaluable but time consuming. Now that that’s in place, and aside from the work I do with TWP, I currently have a few hours free each week where I would like to offer mentoring to those of you who feel you would benefit.

On a limited basis, I’m able to offer one-on-one coaching packages of ten thirty minute sessions for £1,000. 

These sessions would help you to improve in the following ways, plus any further questions regarding your particular needs.

  1. Refinement of your existing technical analysis, strategies and trade/risk management
  2. Trading psychology
  3. Reviews of your trades with constructive feedback
  4. Increase your confidence and trading experience
  5. Help you become more consistent across the board

Please let me know if you are interested, you can contact me directly at adampeterharris@gmail.com

PS. Something to keep in your diary  for the end of November, is that I may be hosting for TWP, a Trader’s Environment Day, which will be a half-day seminar, and I would like to invite you to it. I’ll keep you posted about this!

Warm regards

Adam

The Trader returns! An update about exciting events happening right here!

Hello everyone!

It’s been a long time indeed. There’s quite a bit of news, as so much has happened over the last year.

Since March this year, I have been spending most of my time managing my portfolio of funds, trying to find a better life-work balance, and exploring possible new ventures with regulated London partners.

 

I will continue to focus on my own systems and funds, and am also keen to progress through getting regulated as an individual with the FCA regulatory body.

The first bit of good news is, I now have more time that I did before, and have agreed to join the prestigious company Trade with Precision as a speaker.

The second bit of good news is that I’ve managed to convince two other excellent traders to join this blog. They will be contributing a number of incredible mentoring and analytical pieces for you, aimed at assisting traders in progressing effectively along their journey. More on this soon!

So, be prepared- there should be an increase in content on this page for those of you wanting to improve your skills and see genuine improvement in your confidence and results.

Wishing you all the best,

Adam

London- Canary Wharf

AUDNZD trade alert!

Please evaluate this for yourself before making the final decision!

This is a very short post, guys- apologies.

I’d consider a buy order, to go long on AUDNZD, entering above the high of today’s close bar, so I would place the order on Monday morning.

My stop would be below the most recent low e.g. 1.0340, with at most, 2% of my account risked.

The trade will have to run for up to 3 or even 6 month, or with a target of 1.3500.

Why am I looking at this?:

  1. All time low.
  2. Bottom of historical range.
  3. Strong reversal bar today,
  4. Weekly rejection bar.
  5. Monthly rejection bar in formation. (this could change)
  6. Bullish divergence on Daily chart.
  7. Bullish divergence on Weekly chart.
  8. Bullish divergence on Monthly chart.

 

Hope this helps,

Adam

 

How to spot gambling habits…

Thanks to Layla Andrews for this:

gambling 01

 

Paul Good, a clinical psychologist in San Francisco, developed 11 warning signs that may reveal whether an investor is actually a gambler in disguise. Anyone who exhibits five or more of these signs may have a gambling problem.

1. High-volume trading in which the “action” has become more compelling than the objective of the trade.

2. Preoccupation with one’s investments (e.g., excessive studying of investment newspapers or websites, thoughts about the market that interfere with work or one’s social life, constant calls to one’s broker).

3. Needing to increase the amount of money in the market or the “leverage” of one’s investments to feel excited (e.g., using options or future contracts, borrowing on margin).

4. Repeated unsuccessful efforts to stop or control one’s market activity (e.g., drawing on accounts previously declared off limits, contradicting or changing limit orders on losses or gains).

5. Restlessness or irritability when attempting to cut down or stop market activity, or when cash is accruing in one’s account.

6. Involvement in market activity to escape problems, relieve depression, or distract oneself from painful emotions.

7. After taking losses in the market, continuing to take positions or increasing one’s position as a way of getting even.

8. Lying to family members and friends to conceal the extent of involvement in the market.

9. Committing illegal acts, such as forgery, fraud, theft, or embezzlement, to finance market activity.

10. Jeopardizing significant relationships, one’s job, or educational or career opportunities because of excessive involvement in the market.

11. Relying on others to provide money to relieve a desperate financial situation caused by gambling in the markets

Self-sabotaging behaviour, an article by Brett N. Steenbarger Ph.D.

Could you be sabotaging your own success in trading? Here is a great, and short piece that may feel familiar to you- enjoy 🙂

misc-jackie-chan-l

Behavioral Patterns That Sabotage Traders – Part One

Brett N. Steenbarger, Ph.D.

 

Although I do not maintain a private practice of counseling/coaching for traders, it is perhaps inevitable that traders would contact me for assistance after reading my book on The Psychology of Trading. Once in a while I take on a project of working with a group of traders because of the opportunity to push the envelope and use psychology to improve their trading performance. In the past few years, I would guesstimate that I have gathered personality questionnaire data and assisted over one hundred traders.

That’s a decent-sized sample, and provides me with worthwhile insights into the minds of traders and the problem patterns that interfere with their trading. Below I outline a few of the things I have learned from questionnaires and interviews with individuals who are trading for a living.

  • Most trading problems are varieties of performance anxiety. Performance anxiety occurs when a performance that is usually automatic becomes the object of excessive scrutiny. This attention to the performance creates an interference effect, in which the performance can no longer flow naturally. Such performance anxiety frequently interferes with athletic performance, public speaking, sexual performance, and test taking. Whenever fears about the outcome of a performance dominate the performance, outcomes are apt to suffer.
  • Performance anxiety occurs as much during times of market success as during times of market loss. It is not at all unusual to find traders who are good at taking (appropriate) losses, but who become fearful when they book a gain and take profits prematurely (i.e., prior to reaching their profit targets). Interference effects following strings of losses are no more debilitating than interference effects from pressure that traders feel when they are making money.
  • Traders commonly try to replace negative self-talk with positive self-talk during trading. This is a mistake. When traders are immersed in the market and focused on the screen, they are not engaging in self-talk at all.
  • Perfectionism is the most common source of performance anxiety among traders. Traders tend to be achievement-oriented and often set lofty goals for themselves.These performance goals contribute to tension when the goals are not met. In general, it makes sense to replace performance goals with process goals. Instead of setting a goal of making $250,000 a year, a trader should, for example, set a goal of following a trading plan (entries, position sizes, exits) on 90+% of all occasions.
  • Perfectionism leads traders to overtrade. Overtrading is the most common source of losses among the traders I’ve interviewed. Traders overtrade when they feel internal pressures to make money that blind the trader to what is happening in the markets at the time. Trading when volatility is low, trading outside one’s trading plan or strengths, trading to make up a loss, and trading imprudently large size are examples of overtrading.
  • Traders that master performance anxiety at one level of size (e.g., 5 contracts) frequently re-encounter it once they meaningfully increase their size (50 contracts). We generally calibrate our emotions by the dollar amounts we make or lose. This makes a fifty contract trade much more difficult for traders than a five contract trade, even though the setups may be identical.
  • Traders often think they have worse psychological problems than they actually have. When performance anxiety patterns have interfered with trading for a considerable period of time, traders often become convinced that they have deeply-seated emotional problems that need intensive psychotherapy. Often, the self-perception that one is damaged—that one is emotionally unfit—is a larger problem than the performance anxiety itself, which is a very solvable problem.

To be sure, there are problems other than ones related to performance fears that can interfere with trading. Many of these are described in my book. The unique thing about performance anxiety is that it can afflict highly successful traders every bit as much as rookies. This is because the root of much of the anxiety—perfectionism—tends to be present in the most achievement-oriented and successful individuals. It is truly a double-edged sword.

Somewhere between the extremes of performance pressure and complacent laziness is a happy medium where traders can focus on self-improvement without sabotaging their results. Trading is like dating: You want to keep initial expectations reasonable, enjoy it while it’s happening, and learn from it once it’s over. In the second and final article in this series, I will take a look at strategies traders can use to overcome performance

Brett N. Steenbarger, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY. He is also an active trader and writes occasional feature articles on market psychology for MSN’s Money site (www.moneycentral.com). The author of The Psychology of Trading (Wiley; January, 2003), Dr. Steenbarger has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on short-term approaches to behavioral change. His new, co-edited book The Art and Science of Brief Therapy (American Psychiatric Press) is due for publication during the first half of 2004.